Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan

Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan

413MBDHaAEL. SL160  Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan

  • Programmable buttons for espresso and lungo, folding drip tray for larger cups and recipes, brew ready in 25-30 second
  • Backlight indicators, water level detection, auto power-off, used capsule container, convenient power cord storage
  • 12.83-inch length by 4.33-inch width by 9-1/4-inch height
  • 24-Ounce water tank
  • Aeroccino plus. hot and cold milk froth for cappuccinos,hot milk for lattes. hot milk froth in 70 seconds. cold milk froth in 60 seconds.

The Pixie machine features two pre-set cup settings with reprogrammable cup volumes. As with all of Nespresso machines, perfect in-cup results are assured with a 19 bar pressure pump and thermoblock heating unit producing a delicious and rich crema cup after cup. Includes the Nespresso Aeroccino Plus & Milk Frother. Perfect milk froth in seconds.

buynow big Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan

List Price: $ 279.00

Price: $ 251.06

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3 Responses to Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan

  1. I Do The Speed Limit
    June 29, 2013 at 5:14 am
    47 of 49 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Smaller and portable: Pixie is a superb Nespresso machine!, November 5, 2012
    By 
    I Do The Speed Limit (Down U.S. Route 59) –
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan (Kitchen)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    The Pixie has got to be the smallest and most portable single-serve coffee machine on the market. It has so much going for it! Like other Nespresso machines, this Pixie produces a top-notch coffee product. This particular model offers a milk frother alongside the coffee maker–and that is a real plus. The two together cost less than if purchased separately.

    All things considered: The Pixie works every bit as well as the older and larger (but not much larger) CitiZ and the newest “kid on the block”, the Nespresso U. The Pixie has a smaller water well. It also has a smaller compartment for spent capsules. In my experience that does not matter. In fact, it’s probably better. You should start with fresh water as often as possible and it’s easy and quick to dump spent capsules.

    I think the whole line of Nespresso machines are far better than Tassimo and Kuerig machines. The Nespresso machines are better designed: They work quicker and quieter; have a smaller footprint and are less bulky; are much better looking, and, most importantly, the quality and variety of the espresso blends cannot be beat. I haven’t tried the new Starbuck’s machine, but I do know this Pixie is smaller and has a lot more style.

    Our first Nespresso machine was a CitiZ and it still sits proudly on our kitchen counter. The Pixie was just being introduced when we bought our CitiZ several years ago. We ended up with the CitiZ because it came in a color that better matched the style of our century-old house. But I’ve always thought the Pixie was awfully cute and stylish. And who doesn’t consider a smaller footprint a plus?

    YOU CAN STOP READING HERE: While the above paragraphs sum up my opinion briefly, you can keep reading for more information. Sorry, but I found it hard to streamline this review–after all, I’ve purchased (and dumped) three Tassimo machines; I purchased and use the Nespresso CitiZ and the Latissima on a daily basis; I own a single-serve Gaggia by illy that sees very little use lately; I acquired a Jura ENA Uno about four months ago, and it daily provides us with freshly ground and brewed beans (we buy Peet’s beans), and last, but not least, I’ve also acquired a Nespresso U with an Aeroccino frother. I’m thinking I’ve got some experience upon which I base my opinions.

    MORE ON THE PIXIE:
    –I don’t know why this impresses me, but there is a white backlighting (around the spent capsule compartment) that I think is way, way cool. Plus, the backlighting allows you to safely grab your hot coffee in the dark. If you’re low on water, the light shines red.
    –The Pixie doesn’t drip when it’s done pouring like the CitiZ and Latissima models tend to do.
    –The Pixie is basically portable: Being small and light-weight, having a cord that tucks away and a handle that doubles as the inserter lever, this little guy is easy to transport. You are going to be able to take your favorite coffee with you on a road trip–now that is a very exciting thought!
    –Water heats up hotter in the Pixie (than in the CitiZ). Some people think this is important. I’m not one of them–no matter how hot the coffee is, I think it is very important to heat the cup first. (A very simple thing to do: Add hot tap water to the cup and let it sit in the sink a minute; but, yes, it is still another step to accomplish during your morning rush-hour routine before you leave for work.)
    –The platform that your cup sits on is a bit cumbersome. It folds up for tall cups, but it’s your cup that actually holds the platform up and out of the way. You could consider it a design flaw or maybe it adds to its compactness and portability. This only matters if you like to make fancy concoctions once in a while, forcing the use of a taller cup. (Sometimes I like to pour through some whipped cream or add a shot of something boozy.)

    REGARDING THE AEROCCINO: For the difference in price between a Pixie with or without this stand-alone milk frother, you really should buy the combo. Several years ago when I first investigated this frother, it was valued at nearly a hundred dollars–so there is great value in purchasing it along with the espresso machine. It’s a great little gadget: It has a beautiful shiny metal outside surface that is very substantial; it is quiet; it is quick; it produces beautiful soft foam; the handle is strong and easy on the hand, and because it has a high quality non-stick inner surface, it is easy to clean by simply rinsing it out. Its downfalls: The base is lightweight and will not grip a counter top; the heavy electric cord is adequately long, but excess cord can’t be hid in the base, and the worst offense: The spout will leave you with a drip every time. In comparison to the Starbuck’s model, this frother is made of a high quality, beautiful metal; the Starbuck’s is black plastic.

    COMPARED WITH THE LATISSIMA MILK FROTH: I like…

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  2. Maclen
    June 29, 2013 at 6:09 am
    16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Perfect Cup, November 18, 2012
    By 
    Maclen (Hawaii, USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan (Kitchen)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    Having a cup of coffee has been part of my daily routine for decades now, and for the past few years I’ve been making that cup of coffee with a Keurig machine. After using the Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker and Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother for about a month, I can definitely say that the Pixie espresso maker will officially replace the Keurig.

    This is my first Nespresso product, and first espresso maker for that matter, so I was expecting something similar to my Keurig machine. When I received the Pixie, I was pleasantly surprised at the difference. I found the Pixie to be much smaller and more stylish than my Keurig machine. Even though it’s smaller, the Pixie feels much sturdier, too. The espresso maker and milk frother package also includes 16 sample capsules of various flavors, which are all very good. The espresso the Pixie makes far exceeds what the Keurig can brew and rivals any espresso I’ve had at the various coffee shops here. Although the cup of espresso the Pixie brews is smaller in volume than a regular cup of coffee, I quickly got used to that. I actually found myself taking more time savoring the espresso instead of just gulping it down. Having coffee in the morning is a much more pleasant experience now.

    The features of the Pixie that I found a real plus:

    * The footprint is small which leaves more countertop space.

    * The machine is ready to brew in 30 seconds and brews a cup of espresso in 25-30 seconds.

    * The power cord length is adjustable. Extra cord can be stored in the base.

    * There is a carrying handle that doubles as the lever for the chamber where the coffee capsules get inserted. When lifting the Pixie by the handle, the machine is nicely balanced making it easy to carry.

    * The functions are simple; On/Off button, Regular cup brew button, Larger cup brew button. Both of the brewing buttons are backlit.

    * The machine powers off automatically when not in use.

    * The compartment for spent capsules (which is clear) is backlit by an LED light. Not only does it look very stylish, it also helps to see when you’re brewing a cup of espresso in a dimly lit area.

    * A red light on the back of the machine lets you know when the water level is low.

    * The espresso capsules are aluminum and recyclable.

    * The machine is very easy to clean.

    This package also includes the Aeroccino Plus milk frother. The Aeroccino Plus makes both cold and warm frothed milk that is perfect for lattes and cappuccinos. The frother is whisper quiet and produces soft, pillowy foam very quickly (60-70 seconds.) The frother is also built sturdily and very easy to clean. I often find myself making a quick cup of cappuccino after dinner with a shot of kahlua, something that I never really did at home before.

    At approximately 60 cents, the cost of the Pixie capsules can be a bit steep but I’d spend much more than that for an espresso at Starbucks, and Keurig cups cost about the same. You can get Nespresso capsules at various retailers but it’s cheapest if you order them directly from Nespresso online. Some of the reviews here list the capsules at $.55 each but the capsules I ordered were $.60 – $.65 each. I’m not sure why, but it could be that it’s more costly if you’re ordering from outside of the continental U.S. (I’m in Hawaii.) The cost of shipping for my order was $6.95 via USPS priority mail; not too bad.

    The price for the Pixie/Aeroccino frother combo and capsules is high but you really do get what you pay for. The cost for the combo is also cheaper than if you purchased the Pixie and the frother separately, so you do save some money there. I highly recommend this product if you’re someone who enjoys savoring a good cup of espresso.

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  3. Peter B. Nelson
    June 29, 2013 at 6:59 am
    18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Face-off: Rancilio Silvia vs. Nespresso Pixie, January 7, 2013
    By 
    Peter B. Nelson (Pine Island, MN USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Nespresso Pixie Espresso Maker With Aeroccino Plus Milk Frother, Electric Titan (Kitchen)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    Face-off: Rancilio Silvia vs. Nespresso Pixie

    OVERVIEW: As a long-time coffee snob I couldn’t miss the chance to smackdown these upstart espresso wannabees. Well, more fool me. I was no match for the charms of little miss Pixie; this cheeky wench promptly staked a claim on my valuable counter space, right under the wings of old matron Silvia.

    BACKGROUND: I’ve had a Rancilio Silvia V1 for over a decade. Years ago I made the popular PID modification: a computerized thermostat for superior temperature control. I’ve replaced the boiler, twice, and the steam valve. I’ve upgraded its over-pressure valve and tuned it for optimum steam pressure. I don’t just grind my own beans, I buy fair-trade single-origin 20 pound bulk bags and roast to perfection on a homemade roaster. I make at least four lattes a day, and grind through a pound of coffee a week. To be sure, the PID’ed Silvia is hardly the Rolls Royce of espresso machines, but it is the Toyota Camry: a tried and true performer; a middle-of-the road favorite. The Nespresso is the new Smart Fortwo: affordable, stylish, leading edge, versatile and fun. Sure, they’ll both get you where you want to go, but they’re not really in the same market niche.

    I’ve been wanting to give the Nespresso a workout for a couple years, and when Amazon Vine gave me a chance to review not one, but two models, I jumped. They are: the Nespresso Pixie (C60) and the Nespresso U (D50), both with the Aeroccino Plus milk frother. To which I added the Coffeeduck refillable capsules. What follows is a comparison of all of the above versus my old standby, Silvia.

    SUMMARY: For a quick and tasty single shot of espresso or small cappuccino the Aeroccino frother with the Nespresso U and Pixie do a consistently good job. Compared to my Silvia, well, I’ve made many worse cups over the years, much worse, but, after a decade of mods and mastering technique, these days I usually make better.

    INTRODUCTION: To start with, let me say that the Pixie and U model ranges are not Nespresso’s top-of-the-line but closer to introductory level. Their least to most expensive model ranges are as follows: essenza, U, PIXIE, citiz, lattissima and maestria. As to temperatures, warmup times, and taste, I couldn’t detect a significant difference between the U and the Pixie models, so contrasting them comes down to aesthetics and ergonomics. If I write “the Nespresso” I mean either the U or Pixie models, interchangeably. Also, when I write “cup of coffee” versus “espresso” I’m merely referring to the volume of water pushed through the pod, though a purist would rightly distinguish between a Cafe Americano and a ridiculously over-extracted espresso. Temperatures were taken with my Extech 22-816 digital multi-meter, and weights were taken with a Philips HR2394 kitchen scale. What follows is a particularly long, perhaps overlong, review. If you couldn’t care less for technical comparisons, ancillary diversions, personal opinions and supplemental recipes skip to the succinct conclusion at the end.

    TEMPERATURE: Some people complain Nespresso temperatures are too low, and regarding a cup of coffee it’s a fair criticism; though regarding a shot of espresso it’s wrong. A shot of espresso was usually around 175° degrees Fahrenheit (though it could range from 165° to 180° – more on that later), but a cup of coffee only reached around 155°. In comparison, my Silvia’s espresso temperature was around 165°, but as I can set the Silvia’s PID to any arbitrary temperature, that’s really only relevant as a way of saying the Nespressos are right in the ballpark for espresso. However, many people recommend coffee temperature at 155°-175°, so at 155° the Nespresso really is on the low side.

    VOLUME: Because a “normal” shot of espresso is called a “double”, it is possible for marketing departments to do semantic gymnastics around the term “shot of espresso” with enough ambiguity to avoid a lawsuit. Without getting into a blizzard of definitions, let me simply assert that a single is 1oz, a double is 2oz, a triple 3oz, and what you would normally get if you ordered a shot from a barrista would be 2oz “double” shot of espresso. Now for some hard numbers:

    The Nespresso U had the following default shot volumes: small=0.75oz, medium=1.1oz, large=3.25oz.

    The Nespresso Pixie had these default shot volumes: small=1.55oz, and large=3.5oz (no medium button).

    I say “default” shot volumes because both models are easy to reprogram. And I eventually did so, practicing without a pod, until settling on 1oz single shots for the small button, and 4.5oz coffee cups for the large.

    Now, a cup of coffee is obviously larger than a shot of espresso, but even more so these days. My grandma’s heirloom coffee cups, circa 1970, hold 5 ounces; the smallest for sale at Starbucks is 8 ounces; and my modern coffee mugs hold 11 ounces. The Nespresso…

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